Each state gives creditors and collection agencies varying times to file suit on unpaid and delinquent credit card debt. These times are formally known as statutes of limitations. Note that in all states, these limitations are governed by state laws – not federal.

Understanding the Statute of Limitations

Dependent on the state, debt collectors are allotted a finite timeframe to file suit against consumers with past due credit card balances. These statutes are designed to protect individuals from claims being filed after a reasonable amount of time has passed, and the original records might not be available. Most statute of limitations regarding credit card debt is between 3-10 years or longer. Any outstanding debt outside of the statutes is considered “time-barred debt” and cannot be collected on or sued over.

How Statutes of Limitations Work

Most state laws don’t specifically refer to credit card debt. They do use general terms like “open accounts” or “written contracts.” It is also important to note that state laws can change at any time, and judges interpret the statutes differently. These state laws can change anytime. Additionally, different judges can interpret these laws differently. Being such, court rulings are regularly overturned. The below list details individual state statutes of limitations for credit card card.

State Statutes for Credit Card Debt

  1. Alabama –  3 Years ( Title 6 Ch.2.Sec.37)
  2. Alaska – 3 Years (9.10.053)
  3. Arizona – 6 Years (HB 2412)
  4. Arkansas –  5 Years (4-3-118)
  5. California – 4 Years (Code of Civil Procedure S.337)
  6. Colorado – 6 Years (Colorado Revised Statutes Title 13 S.80-103.5)
  7. Connecticut – 6 Years (Chapter 926 Sec. 52-576)
  8. Delaware – 3 Years (Title 10, Sec. 8106)
  9. Florida- 5 Years (95.11)
  10. Georgia – 6 Years (9-3-24)
  11. Hawaii – 6 Years (657-1)
  12. Idaho – 5 Years (5-216)
  13. Illinois – 5 Years (Code of Civil Procedure 5/13-205)
  14. Indiana – 6 Years (Title 34 Art. 11, 2-9)
  15. Iowa – 5 Years (Ch. 614.1.4)
  16. Kansas – 3 Years (60.512)
  17. Kentucky – 5/15 Years (413.120 and 413.090)
  18. Louisiana – 3 Years (Civil Code Sec.2 Art.3494)
  19. Maine – 6 Years (14-205-752)
  20. Maryland – 3 Years (Section 5-101)
  21. Massachusetts – 6 Years (General Laws Part III Title V Ch. 260-2)
  22. Michigan – 6 Years (Ch.600.5807.8)
  23. Minnesota – 6 Years (Civil Procedure Ch.541.05)
  24. Mississippi – 3 Years (15-1-29)
  25. Missouri – 5 Years (Ch. 516-120)
  26. Montana – 8 Years (11-0-190)
  27. Nebraska – 4  Years (25-206)
  28. Nevada – 4 Years (11-190)
  29. New Hampshire – 3 Years (382-A:3-118 (g))
  30. New Jersey – 6 Years (2A:14-1)
  31. New Mexico – 4 Years (37-1-4)
  32. New York – 6 Years (Civil Practice Law & Rules 2-213)
  33. North Carolina – 3 Years (Civil Procedure 1-52.1)
  34. North Dakota -6 Years (28-01-06)
  35. Ohio – 6 Years (Courts-Common Pleas, Ch. 2305.07)
  36. Oklahoma – 5 Years (5 12-95 A (1))
  37. Oregon – 6 Years (Oregon Revised Statutes, Civil Procedure Ch. 12.080)
  38. Pennsylvania – 4 Years (Judicial Procedure 42 Pa. C.S 552 (a))
  39. Rhode Island – 10 Years (9-1-13)
  40. South Carolina – 3 Years (Code of Laws Title 15 Ch. 3 Sec.530)
  41. South Dakota – 6 Years (15-2-13)
  42. Tennessee – 6 Years (Title 28 3-109)
  43. Texas – 4 Years (Civil Practice and Remedies Code S.16.004)
  44. Utah – 6 Years (78B-2-309)
  45. Vermont – 6 Years (9A-3-118)
  46. Virginia – 3 Years (8.01-246)
  47. Washington – 6 Years (Revised Code of Washington 4.16.040)
  48. West Virginia – 10 Years (55-2-6)
  49. Wisconsin – 6 Years (893.43)
  50. Wyoming – 8 Years (1-3-105)

Conclusion

Creditors and collection agencies should understand the statutes of limitations according to their state. This will help them know if the credit card debt is still collectible and receive a judgment for compensation. If your collection business requires an innovative and secure payment platform, don’t hesitate to give Payment Savvy a call. Since 2010, our expert team has worked specifically within the ARM industry to provide custom and all-in-done payment solutions for agencies of all sizes.